Archive for the ‘html’ Category

HTML 5 Unleashed

HTML 5 Unleashed

HTML 5 Unleashed

This has been a hard review on me in a lot of ways. The first being I found it very difficult recently just to get the time to put into this, and secondly, and more importantly, I just plain suck at Javascript πŸ™‚

This is not the first book on HTML 5 I have reviewed for Pearson, I reviewed the HTML5 Developer’s Cookbook previously, and I hope to be able to review more, because I am just not very savvy with this yet. Thankfully, this really has nothing to do with the book itself though. The book is layed out very well, like all the rest of their “Unleashed” series and I particularly appreciate their orange chapter tabs on the sides of the pages. This helped me a lot as I was flipping back and fourth trying to figure out what I was messing up this time.

The author, Simon Sarris, does a really great job of laying the book out in a sensical manner by first explaining the new stuff in HTML 5 and conceptualizing things a bit before moving into the easy things like working with the new layout and tags on to adding new audio and video goodies and then, where they leave me in the dust, working with canvasing, geolocation and other more advanced APIs.

This book gives really good examples and color illustrations and exercises to follow along with. Just exactly what I need in my HTML 5 learning quest, without being overly wordy, long and over complicated, or too technical. I found it helpful and, with some further practice, I can make better use of it than I do now. For a paltry $45 (retail) you’ll certainly get your monies worth.

And since I mentioned practicing this, it bears mentioning that Pearsons InformIT has just released a flagship new product called a “Learning Kit” which is “a self-paced electronic course that integrates text, graphics, video screencasts, and interactive quizzes into one complete tutorial.” Delivered in zip format it’ll run in any HTML 5 compatible web browser. And to top that off, they are letting me play with the one that goes with this subject, “Sams Teach Yourself HTML5 Mobile Application Development in 24 Hours (Learning Kit)“, which is freaking awesome, because I surely need it.

This stuff is the distance learning wave of the suture my friends and my only hope is they keep remembering me when they need a review πŸ™‚ Thanks again, Pearson!

Thursday, October 10th, 2013

HTML5 Developer’s Cookbook

HTML5 Developer's Cookbook

HTML5 Developer's Cookbook


Ahh yes, another book review. I have to say that most books I review end with me telling you that it’s a good book, but this is NOT the case this time. This is not a good book, it’s a fantastic book!

I consider myself pretty versed in HTML 4 Transitional code, but HTML 5 is a whole different monster. I looked at it a while back but it wasn’t very mature at the time. Things have changed a bit now. There are more browsers that support it now and the support is much better. More and more websites are offering great HTML 5 content and there is some really amazing stuff I have seen it do. I just had to get my feet wet a little more.

This book, the HTML5 Developer’s Cookbook, is a great way to get into this new form of web programming. I really dig the whole “cookbook” concept, which has some well annotated and defined “recipes” for accomplishing different tasks. You get great directions on everything from HTML 5 basic layout, to HTML 5 forms and much much more. This book starts with some forward information on what HTML 5 is and what it is not, a little history and background. It follows with, basically, 2 sections. Practically half the book is devoted to straight HTML 5 layout, tags, element changes, forms, css and media embedding, and the second, more advanced half of the book covers a wide variety of very useful API’s. Things like drag and drop support and SQL support all the way up through really advanced things like media capture and geo-location.

It took me a long time to get through this book, mostly because i really wanted to try a bunch of this stuff myself and there are a lot of code examples (those recipes again). What I *WISH* I had done is to read the back few pages first. You see, a great advantage to this particular book is it comes with a free 45 day access to Safari Books Online copy of the book and it is infinitely easier and quicker to cut/paste code from the book than for me to type it all πŸ™‚ My only gripe would be that you only get 45 days with it. That should be sufficient enough, though, for you to build a personal code repertoire that you can revisit for long after.

As always, it seems, with the selections I get from Pearson, this would be a great buy, fantastic resource to have and is a very good read. Go get your today. You’ll be glad you did!

Saturday, February 11th, 2012

HTML5 Guidelines for Web Developers

HTML5 Guidelines for Web Developers

HTML5 Guidelines for Web Developers


The last time I relearned HTML was in the HTML 4.01 Transitional days, so I was excited to get my hands on some information to help me play with HTML 5. Let me first say that this book assumes that you have some frame of reference for HTML and is probably better suited for someone with a little familiarity, rather than a complete noob. With that in mind, I thought the book did a great job of covering not only the things that have fallen away from HTML, but the new things in HTML 5 as well. There are *plenty* of examples posted throughout the book to help not only keep you interested, but provide practical code snippets for you to use s well. I think the topic itself is fascinating and this book has quickly become a dog-eared reference for my exploration. In fact, the only real negative that I found is there is a lot of javascript in the book, which probably deserves it’s own book, or at lest it’s own chapter. Either way, I feel this book is well worth the price. It certainly has come in handy for me!

Wednesday, September 7th, 2011

The NEW Oldest Linux Show

NewTLLTS

NewTLLTS

  I don’t even remember where the idea came from, but it was decided that after 365 shows, that’s one for every day of the year, folks, that we would consider that “season 1” for the LinuxLink TechShow, and we would then, finally, start on “season 2”. Those 365 episodes comprise 7 years of weekly recordings and add up to roughly 30 days of continual audio, day and night. I guess you could say we have been doing this for a while….

  Since last year’s Ohio Linux Fest we have had a few TLLTS Elders meetings to decide upon what we saw as the problems of the first TLLTS season, what we could do to fix them and what kinds of things we wanted to pursue for season 2. We tried to take into consideration the things we had positive and negative comments on from our listener base and years of our beloved “hate mail” πŸ™‚

  First and foremost we needed to address our constant audio issues. Long have we had complaints about our audio so we needed to make that a priority. We do have a very complicated setup in that area due to our arrangement of multiple hosts and guests in multiple locations, local and remote, not to mention the extra issues caused by being a live show, which causes us to add even more audio sources. You see, we don’t postprocess audio and dub things in later like promos and intro/outros. They happen as we roll along live, just like everything else. As it turns out though, a lot of our audio issues were actually caused by NOT using the Linux built in goodies. They were caused by our analog setup (mixer, compressor, cabling, etc..) Once we identified that we actually could remove that mess all together and just go digital, things got a lot better pretty fast.

  Other and maybe minor things we needed to address had to do with the loose format of the show, the show and guest planning and general preparedness, the timing of things during the show, regular guest hosts, the website and things of that sort. Boy, there sure were lots of things to work on!

  We decided that we needed to tighten things up a bit with the show format. We settled on trying hard to keep the show times from 8:30pm to 10pm (and no longer). We want to try and divide the show into sections, giving time to any interviews we may have while still sequestering some time for us for a little discussion as well. We decided on using some music as a separator, much like we did early on in the show – an intermission. An exciting addition here would be the possibility of also adding in some “shorts” or short topical audio segments dealing with our hosts specialty subjects. These would be not only a way for us to facilitate an important break in the show, but a way to generate some interest in a recurring topic and also provide a possible stepping stone into the hosts discussion on the second half of the show.

  We decided we would like to get not only some more good new guests, but also to revisit some of our wildly interesting past guests to see what they have been up to. Luckily, the ones I have contacted thus far have not only remembered us, but have also agreed to stop by again to say hello πŸ™‚ Make sure to check the calendar for who’s coming up and send along your suggestions of people you would like to hear from!

  One of the major things I was tasked with working on and updating was the website. I thought the old one was fantastic, mostly because I designed and coded it, but the other hosts assured me it was time for something new πŸ™‚ I pursued the great and famous Richard Querin who graciously came up with a great looking front page and theme and sent it to me. A little php work and content by Dann and I and you have the masterpiece you see now.

  I have to say that I really enjoyed doing the show for the last seven years. I get to talk shop with my buddies every week. I get to talk to really cool linux/open source celebrities. I get to meet and make a lot of geeky friends from all over the world, people who I have come to consider as almost family ove the last 7 years. It has been a helluva fun ride and I am eager to put a good start to the next 7, so make sure and head on over to http://tllts.org and join in the fun. The prelude to season 2 was recorded and put up for distribution right at the end of OLF 2010 and the official start happens 9/15/2010 @8:30pm EDT. See ya there!

Monday, September 13th, 2010

My Web Workers Toolkit

Ahh, it’s been far too long since I have had anything to say here. I have to say that I have been *legitimately* busy this time. As many of you know, we have come to a close on the first season of The LinuxLink TechShow. That’s 365 (about) 2 hour long episodes over the course of the last 6 years. We are due to start our next 365 at the Ohio Linux Fest in a month. This leaves an enormous amount of prep work and a fair bit of reorganization to keep things exciting and help us start out with a bang.

One of the *surprises* in store brings me to my current topic at hand, my web workers toolkit.

People all have differing opinions about what you really need to do decent web work. As an old commandline jockey, I thought I would share my own.

1) Vim.
Quite possibly the best text editor in the world, I use vim for darn near everything. As a system administrator, it’s indispensable (for scripting) and I find it similarly necessary for web work. Vim has a fantastic (imho) syntax highlighting system which does quite well for html and php highlighting. The only caveat is to make sure to set “set background=dark” in your .vimrc file, unless, of course, you are one of those wierdos who uses a light background in your terminal.

2) tidy or the w3c validator.
I DEFY you to write good code without one of these. There is NOTHING as nice as standards compliant code and without a good validator, you will have nothing like standards compliant code. The reason I listed both of these is that tidy is a program you can use locally to check your code and the w3c validator will check any pages that are accessible via the web.

3) Many different browsers.
Unfortunately, all browsers are not made equal. You can be sure that all mozilla based browsers like Firefox, etc., will display things very similarly, and maybe even throw Google Chrome into that mix, but you may really want to check your code with Safari and IE to be sure things still look the way you had intended, and let’s not forget about a text browser like lynx or w3m to make sure your pages are readable and navigable that way too.

4) Lastly, for me, some good reference material.
One can hardly be expected to remember everything and having some reference material handy for those odd css commands and perhaps php/perl/python/someotherprogramminglanguage could really save you some time and frustration. Never underestimate keeping your old code around for example and never ever underestimate the power of the power of the Google Search!

In a nutshell, that’s generally what keeps me cranking out websites and webpages. What kinds of things do you use? What am I missing out on? Send a long a comment and let us all know what works for you! ( Unless, of course, you use emacs πŸ˜€ )

Tuesday, August 17th, 2010